Brock webinar to discuss systematic review and popular research method – The Brock News

Systematic review has become a buzzword in academia.

From 1995 to 2017, there was an increase of more than 4,500% in the number of systematic reviews registered in PubMed, according to the Journal of the American Medical Association.

At Brock, interest in this type of evidence synthesis research method is also on the rise, with a growing number of researchers across multiple disciplines requesting support from the Brock University Library.

An upcoming information session will review the main steps and tools for conducting a systematic review, introduce alternative review types, and discuss how to identify the best review type for a research question. research.

So you want to do a systematic review? will take place on Tuesday, November 30 from noon to 1:30 p.m. via Microsoft Teams as part of the Building Better Research series of professional development workshops offered jointly by Brock University Library and the Office of Research Services.

“A systematic review is a form of evidence synthesis, which is this idea of ​​collecting all the research evidence on a specific, focused research question,” said Elizabeth Yates, liaison and scholarly communication librarian, who will lead the webinar. alongside Chelsea Humphries, Liaison and Collections Librarian.

Researchers use rigorous and comprehensive strategies to methodically search databases to bring together studies that are then appraised and synthesized into a powerful research evidence synthesis.

“Once it’s critically evaluated, researchers can draw conclusions about what the weight of the research indicates,” Yates said. “Systematic reviews are useful for resolving areas of research where there might be conflicting evidence or for getting a good overall picture of what the research says.”

Yates said the process requires specialized expertise in comprehensively gathering relevant research and data, which can be difficult to learn – knowing which databases to search for and how they work, being familiar with the search language, knowing what combination of search terms to use and ensure that the overall search strategy can be replicated by others.

Humphries added that research is only part of the process.

“Researchers are developing very sensitive research – gathering a lot of material that needs to be sifted through – so there is also a lot to do to determine inclusion and exclusion criteria as part of a robust selection process” , she said. “There are layers and layers of assessment that happen.”

Humphries said there are also steps throughout the process focused on reducing bias and increasing rigor. Usually, a team of two or three researchers works together on the systematic review project for one or two years.

“It’s a very long and complex process to exhaust the places they’re looking for,” she said. “They are rigorous in how they research these locations and review their results, making their work as unbiased and repeatable as possible along the way.”

Sometimes a systematic review is not possible due to time, resource or capacity constraints, or it may not be the appropriate method for the research question being asked.

Humphries explained that while a systematic review is good at answering a very narrow research question, a scoping review might be more appropriate for a broader question. Alternatively, a quick review is useful when research needs to be completed more quickly to help inform urgent decisions; however, this often requires trade-offs, such as a smaller research team, tighter deadline, or limited research.

The Brock Library has developed a research guide on evidence synthesis and systematic reviews and created a dedicated webpage explaining how the library can help support systematic reviews. In addition to Yates and Humphries, the library’s systematic reviews support team includes Colleen MacKinnon, Liaison Librarian and User Experience, and Jennifer Thiessen, Acting Manager of Liaison Services.

Professors and research students interested in attending the webinar can register via ExperienceBU. Anyone unable to attend the live session can view a video recording which will be posted on the Search enterprise SharePoint site shortly after the session.

Upcoming Build Better Research Series Workshops

So you want to do a systematic review?
Tuesday, Nov. 30 from noon to 1:30 p.m.
Presented by Chelsea Humphries, Liaison Librarian, and Elizabeth Yates, Liaison and Scholarly Communication Librarian.

Overview of Insight Development Grants
Thursday, December 9 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Presented by Sharlee Cranston-Reimer, Research Officer; Kyle Rich, assistant professor of leisure and leisure studies; and Asma Zafar, Assistant Professor of Strategy.

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in Research Proposals
Friday, December 17 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Presented by Sharlee Cranston-Reimer, Research Officer.

An Introduction to Search Metrics and the Dimensions Database
Tuesday January 18 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Presented by Chelsea Humphries, Liaison Librarian, and Elizabeth Yates, Liaison and Scholarly Communication Librarian.

Introduction to proposal writing
Friday January 21 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Presented by project facilitator Julie Gregory and research officers Vincent Annibale, Sharlee Cranston-Reimer, Karen Espiritu, Danusha Kalinga, Suramya Mihindukulasuriya, Monika Ovsonka and Laura Smithson.

Practical introduction to text analysis
Wednesday January 26 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Presented by Tim Ribaric, Acting Director of Brock’s Digital Scholarship Lab and Library of Maps, Data and GIS.

Community engagement in research
Wednesday February 16 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Presented by Julie Gregory, Project Facilitator, and Jayne Morrish, Knowledge Translation Officer.

Collect social media data
Wednesday February 23 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Presented by Tim Ribaric, Acting Director of Brock’s Digital Scholarship Lab and Library of Maps, Data and GIS.

Establish and maintain your research team
Tuesday, March 1 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Presented by Michelle McGinn, Associate Vice President, Research.

Knowledge Mobilization — The Basics
Wednesday, April 13, 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Presented by Jayne Morrish, Knowledge Translation Officer.

All Building Better Research sessions are listed on the Building Better Research webpage.

To suggest topics for the series, contact Nicole Nolan, Associate University Librarian, at nnolan@brocku.ca or Sharlee Cranston-Reimer, Research Officer, Social Sciences and Humanities, at scranstonreimer@brocku.ca